18+ SHOW – please review our minor policy under F.A.Q.
7:00PM DOORS
8:00PM SHOW

Presented by First Avenue and Radio K

Note: special guest Roland Tings has canceled.

[Please direct all questions regarding ticketing and table reservations to First Avenue’s Box Office (Mon-Fri 11am-6pm) at 612-338-8388.]

On Silicon Tare, the sci-fi story that Seth Haley, who records as Com Truise, began on the Galactic Melt LP and continued on the Wave 1 EP takes a dark turn. At the conclusion of Wave 1, the protagonist, Earth’s first synthetic astronaut, successfully makes contact with the far-off Wave 1 colony but, once he does, things get fuzzy. He falls in love; there is a war coming. A story that began in hope and dreams of discovery ends on an uncertain note. Change is in the air.

It’s evident Haley’s style has matured since 2010’s Cyanide Sisters. Sisters wonderfully warped sonics could have been the sound of broken VCRs spinning analog tapes, all of them singing in unison. His 2011 full-length Galactic Melt was rich and expansive, full of slowly-coasting synths, melodies that wriggled and popped, and masterfully controlled rhythms. Since then, Haley’s sound and production techniques have progressed, becoming wider and fuller—high definition 3D madness. His always-cinematic signature sound and 4/4 kick drum patterns are present, of course, but the dynamics and tempos are increasingly more colorful and varied.

Silicon Tare moves Haley and the fictional Com Truise even deeper into the cosmos, discovering new lands along the way and offering a glimpse of where he may travel in the future. And if the characters at the center of his ongoing story may be in peril, Haley himself is in control. Tare sets the stage for the final chapter in Haley’s Com Truise saga, which will be the first official follow-up to Galactic Melt. It’s not only the perfect prelude to that finale, but the perfect representation of Haley’s ever-expanding universe of sound.

 

Clark (2014), boldly eponymous, was the Warp experimentalist’s seventh album in 13 years, climaxing a narrative that commenced with Clarence Park, the first “Clark” attributed album Body Riddle, through the Yin and Yang of Turning Dragon and Iradelphic, and finely honed through this year’s Superscope EP and visually intense Phosphor live show.

This is where the sounds of the machine meet the sounds of the world. A protracted club experience distilled into a cinematic, immersive whole. Clark’s chiseled vision of techno contextualized for a post-rave environment the clean, cold edges of technology eroded over time to produce raw, fascinating new textures. These textures lay the foundations for a hugely kaleidoscopic listening experience filled with warmth. Memorable songwriting packed with melody and subtle, unpredictable shifts in mood? a finely balanced mix of electronic composition, heads down techno, human nature and the environment it was created in. “I wanted to let the weather in with this album”, Clark explains. “It’s outward looking, it’s drenched in sounds of the outside world, sounds free from human intervention: branches crackling in the wind, storms brewing, the stillness of settling snow. It’s all in there, amongst the moreish crunch of industrial machinery”.

The follow up to 2014’s widely acclaimed self-titled album, Death Peak sees Clark weave together the various threads of his extensive work, intertwining euphoric melodies and visceral rhythms of warehouse rave with newer vocal and choral elements.

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